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2 edition of regulation of development of the storage root of sugar beet found in the catalog.

regulation of development of the storage root of sugar beet

David John Hosford

regulation of development of the storage root of sugar beet

by David John Hosford

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Published by Polytechnic in Leicester .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D) - Leicester Polytechnic, Leicester, 1984.

StatementDavid John Hosford.
ContributionsLeicester Polythechic. School of Life Sciences.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18570707M

Abstract. 1. When disks of root tissue from sugar or red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) are washed in running aerated tap water the sucrose contained in them disappears and glucose and fructose are formed Invertase activity in the disks has been measured by a polarimetric method. Freshly cut tissue has a very low activity, but a considerable increase occurs during the first 3–4 days of washing. Sugar Beet edited by A. Philip Draycott. Sugar Beet provides full details of all aspects of the crop, including its agronomy, botany, harvesting and processing. Chapters are written by many experts from around the world. It is an essential purchase for anyone involved with the sugar beet crop and the sugar .

Nearly , acres of sugar beets were harvested in On thatacre, tons of sugar beets were grown and were processed in 68 fac- tories. The approximately 1,, tons of sugar (raw value) produced "the sugar beet roots contributed 20 percent of the estimated national sugar consumption of 7,, tons. Production in Abstract. For the purpose of this paper, sugar beet roots were loaded by creating the impact of aluminium bars falling from different heights. The time history of the force at the con-tact between the sugar beet root and the bar was measured. The response of the sugar beet root to the impact was evaluated in terms of surface displacement.

The development of root quality during the season and the impact of variety, root rots, drought stress, N fertilizer application, defoliation/topping and storage are discussed. A further increase of the sugar concentration in varieties may be restricted by cell turgor and can probably only be achieved with a simultaneous decrease of the.   The results clearly indicate that the SuSy activity in storage roots is not an unrelated coincidence to a particular developmental stage but is indeed correlated with sink strength during the storage root development; therefore, we confirmed the suggested hypothesis based on analysis of one stage of storage root by Yatomi et al. () and.


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Regulation of development of the storage root of sugar beet by David John Hosford Download PDF EPUB FB2

A study was made of the growth of the storage root of sugar beet as a sugar accumulating organ. The storage root grew by simultaneous cell multiplication and expansion from a series of peripheral secondary meristems laid down during the early stages of by: Abstract.

The percentage of sucrose in sugar beet storage root fresh and dry matter is closely related to root structure. It has been suggested that the sucrose content might be increased by using plant growth regulators to modify storage root structure through control of cambial development Cited by: 7.

A study was made of the growth of the storage root of sugar beet as a sugar accumulating organ. The storage root grew by simultaneous cell multiplication and expansion from a series of peripheral secondary meristems laid down during the early stages of development.

The weight of water and of non‐sugar dry matter per cell increased in Cited by: The regulation of development of the storage root of sugar beet Author: Hosford, D. ISNI: Awarding Body: Leicester Polytechnic Current Institution: De Montfort University Date of Award: Availability of Full Text.

Book Editor(s): A. Philip Draycott. Formerly of Broom's Barn Research Station, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, UK STORAGE ROOT DEVELOPMENT AND SUGAR ACCUMULATION. NUTRITIONAL PHYSIOLOGY AND BEET QUALITY. REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT. SUMMARY. Citing Literature. Sugar Beet. Related; Information; Close Figure Viewer.

Browse All Figures Return to by: A mature sugar beet root can grow to 1–2 kg (– pounds) and can contain 8–22 percent sucrose by weight. Sugar beet harvesting usually starts in late September or early October for summer crops and is performed rapidly so as to finish before the soil freezes.

There are two methods of harvesting. Intact sugar beet plants (containing a gram beet) exported 70% of the translocate to the beet, greater than 90% of which was retained as sucrose with little subsequent conversions.

Full text Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or. About this book Sugar beet, alongside sugar cane, is the main source of sugar across the world. Grown widely in Europe, North and South America, Asia and parts of North Africa, the crop is at the core of a multi-billion dollar global industry.

Introduction. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris) is an important source of sugar and is grown as a root crop in Europe, North America, the Middle East, Egypt, India, Chile, Japan and ive control of bolting and flowering is essential for both the cultivation and breeding of sugar beet crops.

High root yields depend on a prolonged vegetative growth phase that breeders have. ground, including beets that are loaded on trucks.

Company has the option of rejecting any diseased, frozen or damaged beets, beets less than 12% sugar, or less than 80% purity, beets which, in Company’s opinion, are not suitable for storage or for the manufacturer of sugar, beets as to which, in Company’s opinion, the terms and conditions.

With rapid growth of the storage root the sugar concentration reaches a steady value which is principally determined by climate, water supply and nitrogen level in the soil and is influenced to some extent by variety and plant spacing.

Sugar percentage in the root is often greater than 15 percent of the fresh root weight. The storage organ of the sugar-beet plant is usually called the root, although only about 90% is actually root-derived, the upper 10% (the crown) being derived from the hypocotyl (Fig.

Selective breeding and improved agricultural practices have increased the fresh weight concentration of sucrose in the sugar-beet root to around 18%, and. It is important to include Tuber and Root Crops in the Handbook of Plant Breeding. They include starchy staple crops that are of increasing importance for global food security and relief of poverty, important millennium goals for the United Nations.

Indeed, was the UN International Year of the Potato in recognition of this role of the potato as the world’s third most important food crop 5/5(1).

from book Root and Tuber Crops are either transported to the factory quickly or placed in storage piles, depending on Because early sugar beet development and production was in the temperate. Sugar beet is an important agricultural crop cultivated in on a total area of million hectares, predominantly in Europe (FAOSTAT).

It is mainly used for sugar production, but a number of. the sugar beet root on the left showing the extent of affected tis-sue. (Courtesy W. Bugbee) Fig. The round, black structures (sclerotia) produced by Botrytis cinerea on sugar beet roots aid in identification of the fungus.

(Courtesy W. Bugbee) Fig. Storage rot of sugar beet caused by Penicillium clavi-forme with coremia of the. Events during early development are examined for their contribution to dry matter distribution in the mature plant.

It is concluded that timing of initiation of the storage root is not a major cause of differences between cultivars of carrot. These may airse from differences in the control of partitioning of assimilate at storage organ initiation.

The growth of the storage root of sugar beet has no specific growth stages and accordingly no phase of maturation (Meier et al., ).

Consequently, sugar yield increases with the length of the growing period, i.e., the number of days between sowing and harvest, and thus intercepted radiation. Several physiological processes were studied during sugar beet root development to determine the cellular events that are temporally correlated with sucrose storage.

The prestorage stage was characterized by a marked increase in root fresh weight and a low sucrose to glucose ratio. Carbon derived from 14C-sucrose accumulation was partitioned into protein and structural carbohydrate. Sugar beet plants were grown for 12 weeks from emergence in growth rooms at temperatures of 10, 17, 24 and 31 °C 50, 80, and cal visible radiation cm-2d-1, and the changes with time.

Drought stress may affect sucrose accumulation of sugar beet by restricting leaf development and storage root growth. The objective of this study was to identify changes occurring in the storage.Abstract. Sucrose uptake by discs of mature sugar beet root tissue incubated in [14 C]-sucrose exhibited nonsaturating kinetics over the concentration range of 1 to was inhibited by dinitrophenol, sodium cyanide, low O 2, and penetrating sulfhydryl inhibitors, sodium fluoride, and oligomycin reduced uptake by 20 and 40%, respectively.Since the beginning of sugar beet cultivation over two centuries ago, root sucrose content has been expressed as a percent of roots fresh weight, primarily because of the ease of density and refractometric measures, and later polarimetry, to gauge soluble solid content in fresh beets.